Why Teachers Are More Grubered Than We Thought...

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Why Teachers Are More Grubered Than We Thought...

Post  News Hawk on Thu Jan 22, 2015 6:44 pm

How Regulation Leads To Low Literacy Among Teachers, Then Students

New York recently administered a test to 11,371 people who want to become public school teachers, a new requirement mandated by the State Board of Regents. Keep in mind that these are college graduates who have been through education schools. Surely they all possess enough knowledge of English to pass the basic Academic Literacy Skills test right?

Not even close. Only 68 percent achieved the passing score of 520 points out of 600. Graduates of colleges in New York City did even worse. At many schools, the pass rate was under 50 percent and at one, not a single student managed to pass. (More details can be found in this New York Post story by Carl Campanile.)

People familiar with education schools are not at all surprised because they're noted for admitting some of the academically weakest undergraduates, then immersing them in progressive theories such as that good teaching is mainly about encouraging students to feel good about themselves. Thus we get the blind leading the blind.

In his sharp and iconoclastic 1993 book Inside American Education, Thomas Sowell wrote of education schools: In short, some of the least qualified students, taught by the least qualified professors in the lowest quality courses supply most American public school teachers. His indictment was aimed at ed schools nationally.

The dismal results of the New York testing shows that things have not improved over the last two decades. That's just what you'd expect in a system where there is no penalty for turning out a poor product.

Mastery of any true field of knowledge is seldom required in ed schools, but as this test reveals, the graduates are generally weak even in the fundamentals of reading and writing. Long ago, most education schools were captured by progressives who adhere to what Heather Mac Donald calls the anything but knowledge theory of schooling in her classic article Why Johnny's Teacher Can't Teach.

But for the happenstance of the new literacy test, no one would know how weak many ed school graduates are in their use of English.

With a few exceptions, such as the teacher preparation program at Hillsdale College (which aims at training teachers for the private school market, where decision-makers don't have to hire graduates of government-accredited programs), most education schools operate with what Professor Sandra Stotsky calls An Empty Curriculum (that's the title of her forthcoming book). It's predictable that many graduates of those programs are of marginal literacy because a good command of English is neither necessary to get into or get through them.

Education schools attract weak students who know they can coast through without much if any hard work. Overwhelmingly, as the National Council on Teacher Quality reports, they earn high grades in their education courses, offsetting low grades in any serious courses they might have to take to fulfill degree requirements.

After graduating, those young people become licensed to teach by passing a state certification test. (Those tests are easy and rarely include anything remotely challenging like the New York literacy test.) With a few exceptions, state laws prevent public school principals from considering anyone who isn't licensed. Thus, our regulations guarantee that classes will be taught mostly by teachers who themselves have weak academic abilities. It's no wonder that American literacy is in a downward spiral.

What to do? Lately, the Obama Education Department has been making noise about new regulations that will supposedly improve the effectiveness of teacher training programs. Education Secretary Arne Duncan wants the federal government to devise a rating system for education schools.

Nothing the federal government can do, however, will change the underlying problem, which is that education schools have a captive market.

If you want to teach in public schools, you must be licensed, but you can't get that license without graduating from an approved education school. As long as public school officials are required to hire only prospective teachers who have gone through the education school mill, we - that is, the hapless children who desperately need academically-minded teachers ­- will continue to suffer from classroom mediocrities.

Contrast that straightjacket with the situation facing principals in private schools. They can hire individuals who have deep subject matter knowledge (which usually goes hand-in-hand with a high level of literacy) and a strong desire to teach. Equally important, they can easily terminate a teacher who turns out not to be good.

That isn't just true in the U.S., but around the world.

In Great Britain, for example, independent schools (i.e., not run by the government) hire many teachers who lack qualification to teach.

As we read in this Telegraph piece What really makes a good teacher? by Barnaby Lenon, schools are happy to appoint an excellent graduate in a subject like physics even if they don't have a teaching qualification. They are classified as unqualified even though they possess the most important quality of all. Good subject knowledge matters not only because at the top of the ability range you need to be able to stretch pupils but also because teachers with good knowledge tend to make lessons for younger children more interesting.

Conclusion: Someone can become a superb teacher without having gone through a long program of formal pedagogical coursework and conversely, going through such a program is no assurance of teaching competence.

State legislators who want to see better teachers in public school classes need to open this field up to competition. Allow principals to hire the individual they think is best qualified and motivated, no matter what his or her educational credentials might be. Let competition and the markets discovery process determine the best way or ways of preparing teachers, rather than continuing to rely on governmental mandates.

Believing that more regulations from Washington will fix what's wrong with teacher training is like believing that more diktats from Moscow would have made collective farming in the Soviet Union efficient.

Let's not wait for futile federal tinkering that might deal meekly with the symptoms of the education school disease; let's cure it with deregulation.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/georgeleef/2015/01/19/how-regulation-leads-to-low-literacy-among-teachers-then-students/

Detroit—Here we come...

pale


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Private School Lauded...

Post  News Hawk on Sat Jan 24, 2015 12:20 pm

This is my daughters first year at IRCS. She's in 8th grade. Previously she attended Safety Harbor Montessori, Country Day School, then public school.

I pulled her out of the "cocoon" in her 7th grade year and enrolled her into a public school so she could get a taste of life in the "real world".

Huge mistake but a great learning experience in retrospect. I could not be happier with the decision to send my daughter to IRCS. She fully appreciates the school, the teachers, and the students. The turn around in one year has been remarkable. IRCS has been a true blessing in our lives.
http://www.ircs.org/admissions/ROR.cfm

Public schools are failing this country!

No


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Re: Why Teachers Are More Grubered Than We Thought...

Post  News Hawk on Sat Jan 24, 2015 12:27 pm

7 Questions About Low-Cost Private Schools in India That We Can Finally Answer

Low-cost private schools are popping up rapidly in many parts of the developing world, especially India where even in rural areas 28% of students attend private schools.  Should governments be supporting these schools as a cheap way to boost learning for the poor?  Or is privatization reducing equity and undermining public institutions?   A year ago I participated in a somewhat heated online debate on this topic, see here and here.  Since then, I've tried to stay on the sidelines, out of a sense that there was no new evidence and not much new to say.

As of yesterday, that changed.  After six years of work, Karthik Muralidharan of U.C. San Diego and Venkatesh Sundararaman of the World Bank released the results of their much anticipated, large-scale randomized trial of a school voucher program in Andhra Pradesh, India.  This promises to be one of those landmark studies that will shape the debate on an important policy question for years to come.   It's also timely, emerging just as India starts implementing a program of public subsidy for private schools at an unprecedented scale as part of the new Right to Education Act.  Here are seven questions we can finally answer:

1. Do low-cost private schools improve learning?

Before the experiment started, Muralidharan and Sundararaman found that students in private schools scored dramatically better on standardized tests of math and Telugu, the local language.  While we all know correlation is not causation, these gaps seemed too big to dismiss. Surely, a disparity of more than half a standard deviation couldn't be entirely due to the sorting of advantaged kids into private schools, right?  

As it turns out, yes it could.
http://www.cgdev.org/blog/7-questions-about-low-cost-private-schools-india-we-can-finally-answer

Taxpayers should be elated: Vouchers work!

Very Happy


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Re: Why Teachers Are More Grubered Than We Thought...

Post  WHL on Sat Jan 24, 2015 12:32 pm

That is the truth! And they want more and more money to fail our children. The educations system is a huge bureaucracy. And the more regulations the government puts on the system, the worse it becomes . It's a shame -I feel sorry for the truly good teachers.
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Re: Why Teachers Are More Grubered Than We Thought...

Post  News Buzzard on Sat Jan 24, 2015 1:48 pm

News Hawk must really enjoy his form of yellow journalism! No The article in the Post says the exam was given to people who want to be teachers, not teachers themselves. I don't see any statistic in the article that supports the amount of these failing candidates who were actually hired! New York State currently has a strict evaluation system that was put into place several years ago, and Governor Cuomo wants to strengthen it this year.

Lastly, some of the best schools in New York, and the country, are public schools!!

1-Jericho High School, Jericho, NY

2-Syosset High School, Syosset, NY

3-Bronx High School Of Science, Bronx, NY

4-Stuyvesant High School, Manhattan, NY

Some charter schools are good, and some are not, and all charter schools siphon money away from local school districts!

Let's not let the facts get in our way!! Rolling Eyes

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Re: Why Teachers Are More Grubered Than We Thought...

Post  Anti Federalist on Sat Jan 24, 2015 2:56 pm

Of course, the larger question is never asked:

How is it that all of you are on the hook to educate other people's children through a payment system that turns all of us from property and home owners into chattel serfs paying rent to the feudal lord?
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Re: Why Teachers Are More Grubered Than We Thought...

Post  WHL on Sat Jan 24, 2015 3:19 pm

You got that right, Anti! As I said, they never have enough money. They always want more!
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Re: Why Teachers Are More Grubered Than We Thought...

Post  News Buzzard on Sat Jan 24, 2015 4:47 pm

Anti Federalist wrote:Of course, the larger question is never asked:

How is it that all of you are on the hook to educate other people's children through a payment system that turns all of us from property and home owners into chattel serfs paying rent to the feudal lord?

That question frequently comes into play, most recently in Kansas. It is the obligation of every state to educate it's young, and since we don't have an income* or sales tax where will the money come from?

*I know we have an income tax on interest and dividends.

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Re: Why Teachers Are More Grubered Than We Thought...

Post  Anti Federalist on Sat Jan 24, 2015 4:55 pm

News Buzzard wrote:
Anti Federalist wrote:Of course, the larger question is never asked:

How is it that all of you are on the hook to educate other people's children through a payment system that turns all of us from property and home owners into chattel serfs paying rent to the feudal lord?

That question frequently comes into play, most recently in Kansas. It is the obligation of every state to educate it's young, and since we don't have an income* or sales tax where will the money come from?

*I know we have an income tax on interest and dividends.

And there is the problem.

Since when did my children belong to the state?

Who took on this obligation?

I never agreed to it.

Where will the money come from?

From the parents of the children, IF parents truly do have first claim to their children and the responsibility of raising them.
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Re: Why Teachers Are More Grubered Than We Thought...

Post  Anti Federalist on Sat Jan 24, 2015 4:59 pm

Serious question NB, have you ever looked at the history, reasoning and methods used to bring forced, compulsory education to the US?
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Re: Why Teachers Are More Grubered Than We Thought...

Post  News Buzzard on Sat Jan 24, 2015 5:41 pm

Anti Federalist wrote:Serious question NB, have you ever looked at the history, reasoning and methods used to bring forced, compulsory education to the US?

You're barking up the wrong tree, Anti. We don't get to pick and choose whatever taxes we do or don't feel like paying. A good school district is an investment for property values in any community, and that's why other districts are looking to get their kids into Kingswood. We have a good program and modern facilities! The state property tax for schools is in place because we don't have an income or sales tax, so pick your poison.

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Re: Why Teachers Are More Grubered Than We Thought...

Post  News Hawk on Sat Jan 24, 2015 5:43 pm

News Buzzard wrote:"...Lastly, some of the best schools in New York, and the country, are public schools!!

1-Jericho High School, Jericho, NY

2-Syosset High School, Syosset, NY

3-Bronx High School Of Science, Bronx, NY

4-Stuyvesant High School, Manhattan, NY
So four schools in NYC vicinity are "some of the best"?

drunken

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I recall schools in NY were hiring qualified teachers from Europe.


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Re: Why Teachers Are More Grubered Than We Thought...

Post  WHL on Sat Jan 24, 2015 6:12 pm

And then of course their is the unfairness of US around the lake, having to pay for "poorer" towns. And poor little Freedom who doesn't even have a school of their own, has to donate to other "poorer" towns. Donor towns, typical of the government socialists.
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Re: Why Teachers Are More Grubered Than We Thought...

Post  News Buzzard on Sat Jan 24, 2015 7:20 pm

WHL wrote:And then of course their is the unfairness of US around the lake, having to pay for "poorer" towns.  And poor little Freedom who doesn't even have a school of their own, has to donate to other "poorer" towns.  Donor towns, typical of the government socialists.

Donor and receiver towns went out a few years back. All towns pay pretty much the same amount in state property tax for schools.

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Re: Why Teachers Are More Grubered Than We Thought...

Post  News Buzzard on Sat Jan 24, 2015 7:42 pm

Here is the property tax database for all towns in New Hampshire. The 2 lowest taxed towns around the lake are Moultonboro, followed by Tuftonboro, and they are 2 of the lowest taxed towns in the entire state.

http://www.revenue.nh.gov/mun-prop/municipal/documents/2014-local.pdf

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Re: Why Teachers Are More Grubered Than We Thought...

Post  Anti Federalist on Sat Jan 24, 2015 7:54 pm

News Buzzard wrote:
Anti Federalist wrote:Serious question NB, have you ever looked at the history, reasoning and methods used to bring forced, compulsory education to the US?

You're barking up the wrong tree, Anti. We don't get to pick and choose whatever taxes we do or don't feel like paying. A good school district is an investment for property values in any community, and that's why other districts are looking to get their kids into Kingswood. We have a good program and modern facilities! The state property tax for schools is in place because we don't have an income or sales tax, so pick your poison.

I'm trying to establish ownership and responsibility.

It's this shared collective burden idea that has health care in such a train wreck.

Why is "the community" such a bunch of pikers and not giving a "free" education for every kid at Brewster Academy?

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Re: Why Teachers Are More Grubered Than We Thought...

Post  WHL on Sun Jan 25, 2015 7:53 am

I don't believe it is entirely gone, NB. I know they changed it a little but I don't think it went away.
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Re: Why Teachers Are More Grubered Than We Thought...

Post  News Buzzard on Sun Jan 25, 2015 8:37 am

WHL wrote:I don't believe it is entirely gone, NB.  I know they changed it a little but I don't think it went away.

I can't see it. The state property tax numbers for schools only has a variable of up to 50 cents, while the local school tax numbers are all over the map from town to town, with one reason being the state sends different amounts of aid to various towns, based on their wealth. There are many towns in New Hampshire with tax rates well over $20 per thousand, as you can see.

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Re: Why Teachers Are More Grubered Than We Thought...

Post  News Hawk on Sun Jan 25, 2015 9:22 am

News Buzzard wrote:News Hawk must really enjoy his form of yellow journalism!

Lastly, some of the best schools in New York, and the country, are public schools!!

1-Jericho High School, Jericho, NY

2-Syosset High School, Syosset, NY

3-Bronx High School Of Science, Bronx, NY

4-Stuyvesant High School, Manhattan, NY

Some charter schools are good, and some are not, and all charter schools siphon money away from local school districts!

Let's not let the facts get in our way!! Rolling Eyes

This "body-slam" of a teacher took place in a NY school Friday!



Don't even dare to take a cellphone from a student!

No


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Re: Why Teachers Are More Grubered Than We Thought...

Post  WHL on Tue Jan 27, 2015 7:34 am

Obama now wants to ditch the savings program that allows parents to save tax free for their children to go to college. Yet, when he was a senator, he voted for it!!!
And he wants to give "free" college to kids. Yep, don't teach people to be smart. Teach them to be stupid, blow all their money, take no responsibility for anything and the government will take care of them. It is like the government is some magic tree that grows money. The don't seem to realize they have to take that money from someone else. What is we ALL decided to take no responsibility???????
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